keep the girl child in school

Keep the girl child in school

  • The Sultan of Sokoto , His Eminence Muhammadu Sa’ad Abubakar  III chaired the Keeping Girls in School Summit’

The Sultan of Sokoto (Nigeria), His Eminence Muhammadu Sa’ad Abubakar  III, together with The Kabaka of Bugundu (Uganda), His Highness Ronald Edward Frederick Kimera Muwenda Mutebi II,  today, chaired the Keeping Girls in School Summit’; a convening of African leaders, traditional rulers, religious heads, youth groups, advocates and thought leaders, in Abuja, Nigeria.

The two-day event brings together influential traditional and religious leaders from across the continent to discuss the critical issue of keeping girls in school to complete primary and secondary education (i.e. 12 years of education) and find solutions from within the rich, diverse cultures and values of Africa’s thought leaders. With poverty being one of the key drivers of keeping girls out of school, the Summit also seeks to promote incorporating in-school skills that generate income.

  • African governments and international development partners have been trying to improve and reduce suffering as a result of pregnancy and child birth.

For decades, African governments and international development partners have been trying to improve and reduce suffering as a result of pregnancy and child birth. Very few improvements have been recorded in the health of women and children, despite studies showing that the health of children substantially improves when the mother is educated. Completion of secondary education by girls has been found to significantly improve not only maternal and child health, but women’s decision-making, as well as their ability to earn a living; thus improving the health and nutrition of families and communities.  This undeniable link between the education of the mother and health and development outcomes of families, shows that the future of African families is dependent on the education of the girl.

The Summit provides a platform for community leaders to share ideas and best practices and develop strategies and networks to keep girls in school. It also serves as a means to sensitize and equip these leaders with the right skills to motivate parents and care givers to be deeply committed to ensuring all girls in their constituencies complete at least 12 years of education.